Home Office in the media

https://homeofficemedia.blog.gov.uk/2020/01/09/home-office-in-the-media-thursday-9-january/

The Guardian on undocumented children

Home Office in the media

The Guardian has covered a report released today by the Mayor of London’s office. However, the Home Office does not recognise the figures quoted.

The Guardian on undocumented children

The Guardian has covered a report released this morning by the Mayor of London’s office, which claims there are more than 100,000 children living in London without secure immigration status, despite more than half of them having being born in the UK.

The Home Office does not recognise the figures quoted in the report and does not agree with its notion that leaving the EU will increase the number of undocumented children.

The EU Settlement Scheme allows applicants, including children, to apply without an identity document when there is a reason beyond their control why they cannot obtain one.

There are also a range of routes and options available for people of all ages to regularise their status, including, children who have lived in the UK for most of their lives.

The Mayor of London’s office report acknowledges it is difficult to accurately calculate the number of undocumented people in the UK.

It states that children who are undocumented can face problems accessing education, health care and later down the line, jobs.

A Home Office statement can be found in full below.

A Home Office spokesperson said:

We do not recognise the figures quoted in the report. There are a range of routes and options available for people of all ages to regularise their status, including, children who have lived in the UK for most of their lives.

We do not agree with the notion that leaving the EU will increase the number of undocumented children. The EU Settlement Scheme allows applicants, including children, to apply without an identity document when there is a reason beyond their control why they can’t obtain one.

Coverage on Martyn's Law

The i paper reports that a “law” requiring entertainment venues to improve security against the threat of terrorism is to be enshrined into future licencing regulations in Manchester.

The move is a response to the Martyn's Law campaign, named after Martyn Hett, who was killed in the 2017 Manchester Arena terror attack, and led by his mother Figen Murray.

The paper reports that the changes to Manchester’s licensing conditions would require all venues in the city to have a counter-terrorism plan.

A Home Office statement can be found in full below.

A Home Office Spokesperson said:

Following the horrendous attacks in 2017 the Government is working to make venues and public spaces safer. This includes reviewing the law around protective security and preparedness arrangements and whether owners should be legally required to put in place counter terror measures.

We welcome the contribution made by Figen Murray and the Martyn’s Law campaign to this work.

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